Methods

Most paintings - and all recent ones - are shown entire with an opportunity to examine details (click on the link beneath the title) and enable you to get close up to the paint surface: important because technique and textural quality give paintings their uniqueness. With imagination you can extend this over the whole painting.

Because of drying problems associated with the paint I've used for many years - something that has baffled even the manufacturers - I have adapted my technique from what someone once called "vigorous and disturbed impasto" to a more pasted approach. You may agree with me that the surface quality has not been compromised; different but no worse, in fact I'm finding the process rewarding: an interesting diversion down an unexpected byway. Detours often lead to mysterious places, and Devon itself is full of them.

Work is mostly based on reality - "objects interrupting light", as my mentor the great painter Henry Israel used to insist.

Portraits, landscapes and figure studies provide the rigour and discipline necessary to impregnate paintings and fuse the elements. The very act of painting is a magical business, an alchemy. It continually throws up new possibilities and problems, both stark and subtle.

Titles often contain clues to the germ of a painting and I've added further comments about the genesis of many where these seem important. Sometimes they are very personal, and I've found that a piece of music or even a lyric in a song can impact on the process of painting. Just my thoughts, and every viewer sees every painting differently. All a so-called artist can do is hope that some thoughts coincide, that some experiences are common, and that the quality of work speaks for itself.

 

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